Assessing Drinking and Driving Attitudes and Behavior: Factor Structure of the Drinking and Driving Scale

Amanda Kraha

Abstract


Drinking and driving is a common problem in the United States, with approximately 11.3% of Americans reporting engaging in the behavior at least once in their lifetime. However, no paper self-report measure of attitudes toward and likelihood of engaging in drinking and driving appear to exist. The current study builds upon a telephone questionnaire from Snortum & Berger (1989). Results from an Exploratory Factor Analysis on Subsample 1 of the data suggest the presence of 4 factors that explain roughly 56% of total variance. Further, a Confirmatory Factor Analysis on Subsample 2 of the data confirms this factor structure.


Full Text:

PDF

References


Arias, E., Anderson, R.N., Kung, H.C., Murphy, S.L., & Kochanek, K.D. (2003). Deaths: final data for 2001. National Vital Statistics Report, 52(3), 1–116.

Baum, S., Sheehan, M., Ferguson, M., & Schonfeld, C. (1998). Drink driving as a social problem: Comparing the attitudes and knowledge of drink driving offenders and the general community. In Proceedings 1998 Road Safety Research, Policing and Education Conference, Wellington, New Zealand. Retrieved from http://eprints.qut.edu.au

Berger, D. E., & Marelich, W. D. (1997). Legal and social control of alcohol-impaired driving in California: 1983-1994. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 58, 518–523.

Chou, S.P., Dawson, D.A., Stinson, F.S., Huang, B., Pickering, R.P., Zhou, Y., & Grant, B.F. (2006). The prevalence of drinking and driving in the United States 2001-2002: Results from the national epidemiological survey on alcohol and related conditions. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 83, 137-146.

Clark, W. & Midanik, L. (1982). Alcohol use and problems among U.S. adults: Result of the 1979 National Survey. In: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol Consumption and Related Problems: Alcohol and Health Monograph 1. DHHS Pub. No. (ADM) 82-1190. Washington, DC: Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off., pp. 3–52.

Crowne, D.P., & Marlowe, D. (1960). A new scale of social desirability independent of psychopathology. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 24, 349–354.

Greenfield, T.K., & Rogers, J.D. (1999). Alcoholic beverage choice, risk perception and self-reported drunk driving: Effects of measurement on risk analysis. Addiction, 94, 1735–1743.

Gusfield, J.R. (1985). Social and cultural contexts of the drinking-driving event. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 10, 70-77.Kraha, A., & Boals, A. (2010). Parents and vehicle purchases for their children: A surprising source of weight bias. Obesity, 19, 541–545.

Marelich, W. D., Berger, D. E., & McKenna, R. D. (2000). Gender differences in control of alcohol-impaired driving in California. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 61, 396–401.

Preacher, K. J., & MacCallum, R. C. (2003). Repairing Tom Swift’s electric factor analysis machine. Understanding Statistics, 2, 13–43.

Sheehan, M. (1994). Alcohol Controls and Drink Driving: the Social Context, Federal Office of Road Safety Monograph CR 142. Canberra: AGPS.

Snortum, J.R . (1988). Deterrence of Alcohol-Impaired Driving: An Effect in Search of a Cause. In Social Control of the Drinking Driver (Eds. ed. Lawrence M .J. Snortum, and F. Zimring, Chicago: U. of Chicago P: 189–226.

Snortum, J.R . (1988). Deterrence of Alcohol-Impaired Driving: An Effect in Search of a Cause. In M. D. Snortum, J.R. Zimring, M.D. Laurence, J.R. Snortum, and F. E. Zimring (Eds.), Social Control of the Drinking Driver (pp.189-226). Chicago: University of Chicago.

Wechsler, H., Lee, J.E. Nelson, T.F., & Kuo, M. (2002). Underage college students’ drinking behavior, access to alcohol, and the influence of deterrence policies. Journal of American College Health, 50, 223–236.

Zwick, W. R., & Velicer, W. F. (1986). Comparison of five rules for determining the number of components to retain. Psychological Bulletin, 99, 432–442.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Copyright (c) 2017 The New School Psychology Bulletin

© The New School Psychology Bulletin | editors@nspb.net