Stalinism, 
Memory 
and 
Commemoration:
 
Russia’s
 dealing
 with
 the 
past


Christian Volk

Abstract


In
 the
 last
 twenty‐five
 years
 there
 has
 been
 a
 significant
 change
 in
 the
 way
 political
 communities
 deal
 with
 their
 past.
 A
 “national”
 policy
 of
 remembrance,
 which
 highlights
 the
 heroic
 deeds
 of
 its
 members,
 commemorates
 its
 own
 victims
 and
 crimes
 inflicted
 by
 other
 entities,
 and
 forgets
 about
 crimes
 committed 
in 
the 
name 
of 
one’s 
own
community 
seems 
to 
be 
replaced
 by 
a
“post‐national”
policy 
of 
remebrance.
 In
 several
 countries
 dealing
 with
 the
 dark
 sides
 of
 one’s
 history
 has
 become
 a
 significant
 topos
 within
 a
 policy
 of
 remembrance
 and
 cultural
 commemoration.
 In
 contrast,
 a
 country
 like
 Russia
 refuses
 to
 step
 into
 this
 process
 of
 establishing
 a
 new
 post‐national
 régime
 d’historicité
 and
 refers
 to
 history
 only
 in
 order
 to
 strengthen
 its
 national
 identity:
 While
 remembering
 its
 effort
 in
 defeating
 Germany
 in
 the
 “Great
 Fatherland 
War,”
Russian 
society 
forgets 
about 
the 
trauma
 of 
the
 Gulag 
and 
crimes
committed 
in 
its 
name
 in
 other
 former
 states
 of
 the
 Soviet
 Union.
 My
 paper
 argues
 that
 the
 specific
 setting
 of
 Russia’s
 official
 policy
 of
 remembrance
 is
 due
 to
 the
 notion
 of
 a
 society
 of
 heroes
 once
 forcibly
 institutionalized
 as
 the
 constitutive
 historiographical
 principle
 by
 Stalin’s
 regime.
 Regarding
 to
 the
 discourse
 in
 the
 field
 of
 memory
 such
 a
 forced
 interconnection
 between
 historiography
 and
 memory
 could
 be
 characterized
 as
 »occupied
 memory«.
 Although
 Russia’s
 official
 policy
 of
 remembrance
 passed
 through
 several
 quite
 dif‐ ferent
 phases,
 nowadays,
 however,
 a
 critical
 approach
 to
 Russia’s
 past
 has
 been
 replaced
 by
 a
 “patriotic
 consensus” 
that
 expresses 
a 
new
–
or 
better
–
 an 
old
 Russian 
concept
 of 
identity.


Full Text:

PDF

References


Arendt, H. (1994). Origins of Totalitarianism. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Arnold S. (1998). Stalingrad im sowjetischen Gedächtnis. Kriegserinnerung und Geschichtsbild im totalitären Staat. Bochum: Projekt Verlag.

Assmann, A. (1995). Funktionsgedächtnis und Speichergedächtnis. Zwei Modi der Erinnerung. In Kerstin Platt & Mihran Dabag (Eds.), Generation und Gedächtnis. Erinnerung und kollektive Identität (pp 169‐ 185). Wiesbaden: Opladen Verlag.

Assmann, A. (2006). History, Memory, and the Genre of Testimony. Poetics Today. In­ternational Journal for Theory and Analysis of Literature and Communication, 27, 261‐ 273.

Assmann, J. (1988). Kollektives Gedächtnis und kulturelle Identität. In Jan Assmann & Toni Hölscher (Eds.), Kultur und Gedächtnis (pp 9‐19). Frankfurt: Suhrkamp Verlag.

Assmann, J. (1995). Erinnern, um dazuzugehören. Kulturelles Gedächtnis, Zugehörigkeits struktur und normative Vergangenheit. In Kerstin Platt & Mihran Dabag (Eds.): Generation und Gedächtnis. Erinnerung und kollektive Identität (pp 51‐75). Wiesbaden: Opladen Verlag.

Benhabib, S. (2004). The Rights of Others. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Diner, D. (1995). Nationalsozialismus und Stalinismus. Über Gedächtnis, Willkür, Arbeit und Tod In Dan Diner (Ed.), Kreisläufe. National sozialismus und Gedächtnis (pp 47‐ 75). Berlin: Berlin Verlag.

Diner, Dan (1996). Massenvernichtung und Gedächtnis. Zur kulturellen Strukturierung historischer Ereignisse In Hanno Loewy & Bernhard Moltmann (Eds.): Erlebnis. Gedächtnis. Sinn: Authentische und konstruierte Erinnerung (47‐55). Frankfurt/New York: Campus Verlag 47‐55.

Geyer, Dietrich (1985). Klio in Moskau und die sowjetische Geschichte. Sitzungsberichte der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften. Philosophisch‐historische Klasse. Heidelberg: Carl Winter Universitätsverlag Heidelberg.

Guenther, Hans (1993). Der sozialistische Übermensch. Maksim Gor ́kij und der sowjetische Heldenmythos. Stuttgart/Weimar: Metzler Verlag.

Guenther, H. (1994). Der Held in der totalitären Kultur In Alisa B. Ljubimowa & Hubertus Gassner (Eds.): Agitation zum Glück. Sowjetische Kunst der Stalinzeit (70‐ 75). Bremen: Edition Temmen.

Halbwachs, M. (1992). On Collective Memory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Hosking, G. A. (1989). Memory in a Totalitarian Society: The Case of the Soviet Union In Thomas Butler (Ed.): Memory, History, Culture and the Mind (115‐130). Ox‐ ford: Oxford University Press.

Ignatow, Assen (1999). Vergangenheitsbewältigung und Identität im gegenwärtigen Russland. Köln: Bundesinstituts für ostwissenschaftliche und internationale Studien.

Kuebart, F. (1967). Das Bild der Stalin‐Ära in der sowjetischen Schule. Osteuropa, 17, 295‐302.

Lewin, Moshe (2001). Russland und seine sowjetische Vergangenheit, taz, 14 December 2001, 18‐19.

Ferretti , M. (2005). Unversöhnliche Erinnerung. Krieg, Stalinismus und die Schatten des Patriotismus. Osteuropa, 55, 45‐55.

Nietzsche, F. (1972a). Genealogie der Moral In Werke. Bd. III, edited by K. Schlechta. Frankfurt a.M./Berlin/Wien: Hanser Verlag.

Nietzsche, F. (1972b). Jenseits von Gut und Böse In Werke. Bd. III, edited by K. Schlechta, Frankfurt a.M./Berlin/Wien: Hanser Verlag.

Nora, P. (1990). Zwischen Geschichte und Gedächtnis, Frankfurt: Suhrkamp Verlag.

Plaggenborg, S. (2001). Die Sowjetunion. Versuch einer Bilanz. Osteuropa, 51, 761‐777.

Renner, A. (2000). Erfindendes Erinnern.

Das russische Ethnos im russländischen nationalen Gedächtnis. Archiv für Sozial­ Geschichte, 40, 91‐111.

Simon, G. (1995). Zukunft aus der Vergangenheit. Elemente der politischen Kultur in Russland. Osteuropa, 45, 455‐482.

Solzhenitsyn, A. I. (1985). The Gulag Archipelago. 1918‐1956. An Experiment in Literary Investigation. New York: Harper & Row.

Sperling, Walter (2001). “Erinnerungsorte” in Werbung und Marketing. Osteuropa, 51, 1321‐1341.


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Copyright (c) 2017 The New School Psychology Bulletin

© The New School Psychology Bulletin | editors@nspb.net